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Titel
Blood ties : religion, violence, and the politics of nationhood in Ottoman Macedonia, 1878-1908 / İpek Yosmaoğlu
VerfasserYosmaoğlu, İpek
ErschienenIthaca : Cornell University Press, 2014
Umfang1 Online-Ressource (339 pages)
Anmerkung
Includes bibliographical references and index
SpracheEnglisch
DokumenttypE-Book
SchlagwörterNationalismus / POLITICAL SCIENCE ; Political Ideologies ; Nationalism & Patriotism / HISTORY ; Europe ; General / European history / History / Humanities / Regional and national history / HISTORY ; Europe ; Eastern / HISTORY ; Europe ; General / Ethnic conflict / Ethnic relations / Macedonian question / Nationalism / Political violence / Makedonische Frage / Nationalismus / Europe ; Macedonia / Makedonien / Osmanisches Reich / Balkanhalbinsel / History
URLVerlag ; Verlag
URNurn:nbn:de:gbv:3:5-96434 
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Blood ties [2.18 mb]
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Zusammenfassung

"The region that is today the Republic of Macedonia was long the heart of the Ottoman Empire in Europe. It was home to a complex mix of peoples and faiths who had for hundreds of years lived together in relative peace. To be sure, these people were no strangers to coercive violence and various forms of depredations visited upon them by bandits and state agents. In the final decades of the nineteenth century and throughout the twentieth century, however, the region was periodically racked by bitter conflict that was qualitatively different from previous outbreaks of violence. In Blood Ties, Ipek K. Yosmaoglu explains the origins of this shift from sporadic to systemic and pervasive violence through a social history of the Macedonian Question"--

Zusammenfassung ([])

The Ottoman Empire, the Balkans, and the great powers on the road to Mürzsteg -- Education and the creation of nation space -- Territoriality and its discontents -- Fear of small margins -- A leap of faith : disputes over sacred space -- Logic and legitimacy in violence

Schlagwörter
"The region that is today the Republic of Macedonia was long the heart of the Ottoman Empire in Europe. It was home to a complex mix of peoples and faiths who had for hundreds of years lived together in relative peace. To be sure these people were no strangers to coercive violence and various forms of depredations visited upon them by bandits and state agents. In the final decades of the nineteenth century and throughout the twentieth century however the region was periodically racked by bitter conflict that was qualitatively different from previous outbreaks of violence. In Blood Ties Ipek K. Yosmaoglu explains the origins of this shift from sporadic to systemic and pervasive violence through a social history of the Macedonian Question"--
Schlagwörter ([])
The Ottoman Empire the Balkans and the great powers on the road to Mürzsteg -- Education and the creation of nation space -- Territoriality and its discontents -- Fear of small margins -- A leap of faith : disputes over sacred space -- Logic and legitimacy in violence
Notiz